Bluelight Mid Atlantic - Mar/Apr 2017

Brothers and Sisters, I hope everyone has had a good holiday season and is ready for the work year. I have pre-jobbed a few jobs in NC and have several good jobs coming up. It looks like we are going to have a great year. I encourage anyone needing to brush up on their welding skills to take advantage of the Training Center so you will be ready for this work season.

Steward School is not far off. Hopefully, a large number of you will be able to attend. Not only it is a great learning opportunity to better understand the agreement we work under, but there are also several fun activities. The Ladies of 798 Basket Auction is an exciting event that helps several charities. For those of you who like golf, the tournament is a fun event as well. I understand there will also be a sporting clay shoot for gun enthusiasts. The Lincoln BBQ will be on Tuesday, and the Miller Electric Crawfish Boil is on Friday.

The Family and Retiree Banquet on Thursday night, honoring members with 50 or more years of service, is an event everyone needs to make plans to attend. These retirees are the ones who helped shape our union and gave us the great, safe working conditions we enjoy today. Come and thank these retirees for their dedication to the life they have made for us.

I hope to see you at Steward School or out on the ROW this year. Thank you for all your hard work last year, and I hope everyone makes 2017 a great year.

 

Pre-jobs:

B&G Pipeline:

-Creedmoor, NC. Various Maintenance. Welder Foreman: Doug Elliott. Superintendent: Victor Cardenas. Working 5-10s. Special Agreement. Approx. completion 12-31-17.

-Wilmington, NC. 6-8” Fabrication. Welder Foreman: Nathan Ferguson. Superintendent: Blake Friel. Working 6-10s. Special Agreement. Approx. completion 3-10-17.

MORE 798 STORIES

  • Bluelight Northeast - Mar/Apr 2017
    I am writing this Blue Light report after returning from the 2017 Marcellus-Utica Conference. This year’s conference had a more positive atmosphere due to expected deregulation of the current permitting process. During the conference I listened to gas company CEOs speak about how great the demand is for Northeast Marcellus gas. When there is demand, you need supply, and that is where 798 steps in. The pipelines we build supply the gas needed as our country continues to grow and inevitably demands more energy. There are quite a few projects scheduled for this year, and in 2018 that will help with the supply vs. demand issue that we currently face.
  • Bluelight Southwest - Mar/Apr 2017
    I am writing my report from my office in Colorado where we have had a hard winter this year. Spring is starting to try to peak through, and we are all ready to get the year started off right by attending the Local Union 798 Steward School in Tulsa, OK.
  • Bluelight Midwest - Mar/Apr 2017
    Dear Brothers and Sisters, President Trump has been busy his first week on the job. Just as he promised on the campaign trail, he has pushed for the construction to finish on the Dakota Access and the Keystone XL. I’m not sure when we might see the KXL, but I feel fairly confident that the DAPL will be tied-in at the river before long. Many people, including myself, are wondering about the future pipeline permits now that FERC has only two commissioners. This board usually requires three members for a quorum to make decisions, so moving forward this board needs at least one appointment to fulfill its obligation. Even if an appointment is made, that person would have to be vetted through the Senate, which could take weeks or months. Who knows? At least six major projects totaling more than 10 billion dollars hang in the balance. This includes the Nexus, 250 miles of 36”/42”; PennEast,120 miles of 36”; and Northern Access Pipeline, 97 miles of 24”. Ten billion dollars worth of work is the exact reason we must continue to reach out through our Action Page to advocate for this infrastructure.
  • Bluelight Texas - Mar/Apr 2017
    Brothers and Sisters, I am writing this report from West Texas while checking on non-union jobs. The work out here is still slow, but a few smaller jobs are going on. It seems the drilling is starting to pick up in this area so that’s always a good sign for us. As usual, when the work slows the non-union waste no time slashing wages and good conditions are nonexistent. Many are working for contract wages with no overtime, furnishing consumables or liability insurance.